This image combines an image taken with Hubble Space Telescope in the optical (taken in spring 2014) and observations of its auroras in the ultraviolet, taken in 2016.
©:NASA / ESA
This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, shows a spiral galaxy named NGC 278. This cosmic beauty lies some 38 million light-years away in the northern constellation of Cassiopeia (The Seated Queen).
©:NASA / ESA
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has snapped the This new image of the Antennae Galaxies shows obvious signs of chaos. Clouds of gas are seen in bright pink and red, surrounding the bright flashes of blue star-forming regions — some of which are partially obscured by dark patches of dust.
©:NASA / ESA

This Hubble image shows the central region of a spiral galaxy known as NGC 247. NGC 247 is a relatively small spiral galaxy in the southern constellation of Cetus (The Whale). Lying at a distance of around 11 million light-years from us, it forms part of the Sculptor Group, a loose collection of galaxies that also contains the more famous NGC 253 (otherwise known as the Sculptor Galaxy).
©:NASA / ESA
At the far right, the city of Bajestan is visible, with many agricultural fields around it. It is a city with a population of some 11 000, with saffron and pomegranate its most important products, grown in the various plots on the left. The shades of red indicate how sensitive the multispectral instrument on Sentinel-2A is to differences in chlorophyll content, providing key information on vegetation health.This false-colour image – also featured on the Earth from Space video programme – was captured by Sentinel-2A on 22 February 2016. The satellite is the first in the two-satellite Sentinel-2 mission for Europe’s Copernicus programme, carrying a wide-swath high-resolution instrument with 13 spectral bands, for a new perspective on our land and vegetation.
©:NASA / ESA
The Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over the very eastern part of the Sundarbans in Bangladesh, in this natural-colour image. A region comprising southern Bangladesh and a small part of the Indian state of west Bengal, the whole area of the Sundarbans incorporates some 10 000 sq km, consisting of mangrove and swamp forests. The region of the Sundarbans appears in dark shades of green in this image, while the adjacent areas in brighter colours are densely populated and dominated by agriculture. Sundarbans is the world’s largest single chunk of tidal halophytic mangrove forest. Generally, fresh water is required for plants, but these mangrove forests can also thrive in saline water.
©:NASA / ESA
This image of the Moon was taken by amateur photographer Dylan O’Donnell as the International Space Station passed by at 28 800 km/h. At such speeds the weightless research laboratory was visible for only about a third of a second before returning to the dark skies. Dylan captured the moment in Byron Bay, New South Wales, the eastern-most point of Australia, where the absence of larger towns offers low levels of light pollution. The image was taken on 30 June 2015 at 19:54 local time with the Space Station flying 400 km above the Pacific Ocean. A conventional camera was placed behind a 2300 mm / f10 telescope and Dylan took as many pictures as possible during the Station’s brief passage and hoped for the best.
©:NASA / ESA
An astronaut on ESA's underground astronaut training course CAVES admires a 100-m wall during their six-night underground expedition, July 2016. during ESA’s underground training course “Cooperative Adventure for Valuing and Exercising human behaviour and performance Skills” – CAVES – focuses on multicultural approaches to leadership, following orders, teamwork and decision-making so astronauts can improve their skills. In 2016 the astronauts were each assigned a role for the underground expedition: Japanese astronaut Aki Hoshide shared commander and campsite duties with NASA’s Ricky Arnold, exchanging command halfway through the mission. China’s Ye Guangfu was the team's survey and data engineer, while Russian Sergei Korsakov took up photo and video engineering duties. ESA astronaut Pedro Duque was the expedition’s scientist for environmental science, geology and microbiology, while NASA’s Jessica Meir was the biologist.
©:NASA / ESA
Part of the Anti-Atlas mountains bordering the Sahara Desert in western Algeria is pictured in this satellite image. The Anti-Atlas range was born from continental collision, and geologists believe it was once higher than the Himalayas, but was reduced through erosion. Here the land is mostly dry and barren as the mountains belong to the Saharan climate zone. But some stream channels created by occasional water runoff or from when the climate was much wetter than today, are visible. The circle at the centre of the image is the Ouarkziz crater. Some 3.5 km across, the crater was created when a meteor hit Earth less than 70 million years ago, when dinosaurs still roamed the planet. This image was captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite on 9 March.
©:NASA / ESA
On 5 October 2016, Ariane 5 flight VA231 lifted off from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana and delivered two telecom satellites, Sky Muster II and GSAT-18, into their planned orbits. After satellite separation, the upper stage coasted for another 30 minutes to mimic the longer missions of Ariane 6. During this time, 65 sensors and a camera inside the liquid hydrogen tank observed the propellant’s behaviour under microgravity as the stage manoeuvred. The collected data, returned through the New Norcia ground station in Australia, will help in designing the Ariane 6 upper stage. With 74 successful launches in a row, Ariane 5 matches the reliability of Ariane 4.
©:NASA / ESA
A picture of United Kingdom under aurora taken by ESA astronaut Tim Peake during his six-month Principia on the International Space Station. He is performing more than 30 scientific experiments for ESA and taking part in numerous others from ESA’s international partners.
©:NASA / ESA
This image from the Landsat-8 satellite shows the Colima volcano in Mexico on 6 September 2016 before it started to erupt on 30 September.
©:NASA / ESA
This image from Copernicus Sentinel-3A shows the temperature at the top of Hurricane Matthew at 03:13 GMT (05:13 CEST) today, as it approached Florida in the USA. The temperature of the clouds at the top of the storm, about 12 km from the ocean surface, range from about –80°C just outside the eye of the storm to about 25°C at sea level in the Gulf of Mexico, where it is relatively calm. This monster 400 km-wide hurricane was about 200 km northwest of Miami Beach when the image was taken. Having already caused devastation in the Caribbean, Matthew is the most powerful hurricane to threaten the US Atlantic coast in more than a decade – and it is thought that it could be the most catastrophic to hit Florida in more than a 100 years.
©:NASA / ESA